An Up-Close Story

When Benjamin Habel reaches for the paint pot, the sleeve of is shirt is pulled up. “Mors certa, hora incerta” – death is certain, but the hour is uncertain. The tattoo, in a curved font, reaches from his elbow to his wrist. It is only one of many tattoos that Benjamin Habel is proud to bear. “My tattoos tell the story of my life,” he says, laughing.

Benjamin Habel – a man who makes an impression.

“I did a training to become an occupational therapist In Thuringia, which is where I met my present wife. After the training we then both moved to Bavaria and lived there for six years. When our son was born, we both moved back to our homeland in Thuringia.” When he arrived in Pößneck, he made a new start. “I wanted something to do in the media, not just continue on a single track. And of course I wanted to give my family some security.“ His parents-in-law worked at GGP Media, so he sent an application off to the company to become an offset printer. He received one of the coveted trainee positions and showed great commitment from day one. Then, in 2001, the accident happened. His great passion up to that day had been riding his mountain bike downhill. Benjamin no longer knows exactly what happened, but the bike somersaulted over with him and caught his right hand.

A new beginning “When the accident happened, I could no longer continue as a print worker. GGP then offered to re-train me. I am very thankful for that.” For GGP Media, it was a clear-cut case. A solution is always sought for trainees like Benjamin, who take such pride in their work. The company is very keen to keep such valuable members of staff within its ranks. In the end, both parties benefit from this approach. Benjamin moves to the sales department and learns to be an office manager, which is a completely new area of work for him. Once again, Benjamin strikes out in a new direction and once again, he hits the ground running – interpreting figures, accepting and placing orders, conducting negotiations. He feels at home in his new team and they have accepted him with open arms. In summer 2016, he successfully completed his re-training. “My task now is just to knuckle down. I want to get good – really good – at what I do. To do that, I need experience and great colleagues. I’ve already got the great colleagues, so now I need to gain the experience,” he says, grinning.

Each one of his tattoos represents part of his life.

I want to get good – really good – at what I do.

After his downhill accident he started a new career as an office administrator.

There’s no looking back. Benjamin Habel seems to have arrived. He has an employer who gives him the freedom to stay the way he is, in spite of high demands on his performance and commitment. “It’s a constant give and take in life. Who knows what lies ahead for me,” he said. On the day of the accident he put his downhill bike up for sale. “I’m not the kind of person who looks back. That was a great time, but life goes on now.” He goes past the sheet-offset machine, up on the third floor, back to his desk in the open-plan office. Taking things as they are, showing courage and giving my best. For Benjamin Habel that’s part of life, just like his tattoos. “LIFE” is imprinted in capital letters on the fingers of his left hand.

It’s a constant give and take in life. Who knows what lies ahead for me. I’m not the kind of person who looks back.

We are looking for the right stuff. Find out about our apprenticeship jobs and become a part of GGP Media.